GammaTile Therapy

Education

Learn more about GammaTile Therapy

We invite you to browse through the videos, read the FAQs, and take a deep dive into the science behind GammaTile Therapy by watching the webinars and reading the clinical publications.

Note: In January 2020, GammaTile Therapy was FDA cleared for the treatment of newly diagnosed malignant brain tumors of all types in addition to the existing clearance for recurrent brain tumors. 

GammaTile in the Media

WeTV | March 21, 2020 | New approach for the treatment of brain tumors on the lifestyle list

North Carolina CBS | January 24, 2020 | Vidant Health™ and the ECU Brody School of Medicine successfully perform the first-in-state GammaTile procedure

Cronkite News Division of Arizona PBS | Oct 22, 2019 | Battling brain tumors with time-released radiation

Arizona CBS | August 14, 2019 | New therapy to slow down brain tumors forever changes Arizona woman's life

Florida NBC | March 20, 2020 | GammaTile: New approach for the treatment of brain tumors

Ohio CBS | November 7, 2019 | New brain cancer therapy provides radiation right at site of tumor 

Ohio CBS | August 20, 2019 | Mayfield Brain and Spine neurosurgeon using new radiation therapy

Arizona PBS | June 11, 2019 | GammaTile Therapy implantable brain tumor treatment with Dr David Brachman 

Minnesota CBS | February 14, 2019 | New brain cancer treatment GammaTile Therapy at University of Minnesota with survivor Linda Tinega

 

March 18, 2020 | Physician Perspective on GammaTile Therapy | Dr. McCracken, a neurosurgeon at Piedmont Atlanta Hospital

August 14, 2019 | Physician Perspective on GammaTile Therapy | Dr Clark Chen, a neurosurgeon at University of Minnesota Health

Physician Perspectives

 

Founder Interview | October 1, 2018 |
Introducing GammaTile Therapy

What I like about GammaTile is that they’re taking a radiation technology that already exists and making it safer and easier to deliver… [It] should be equally effective and faster to implant after tumor surgery…[It’s] better for patients (with less anesthesia time) and safer for the staff (with less exposure in the OR).

  Dr Helen Shih  

Radiation Oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital

FAQs

Below are the answers to important questions about GammaTile Therapy. Speak with your treatment team to see if GammaTile Therapy is right for you or your loved one.

 

What is GammaTile Therapy?


GammaTile is a Surgically Targeted Radiation Therapy (STaRT) for operable brain tumors that provides immediate radiation treatment after tumor removal. Each GammaTile has radiation sources embedded in a collagen tile that deliver a precise dose of radiation focused right where it is needed and away from healthy brain tissue. In a clinical study, this resulted in nearly twice as many tumor-free months compared to the patients’ most recent prior
same-site treatment.[1] Learn more about the clinical study.
Hear Dr Clark Chen, the chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota, explain GammaTile Therapy.




How does GammaTile Therapy work?


The neurosurgeon places the GammaTile(s) precisely where treatment will help the most—immediately after tumor removal. Like other radiation therapies, GammaTile Therapy works by disrupting the tumor cell replication process. Radiation damages the tumor cell DNA, so the cell is unable to replicate and eventually dies. The collagen tile keeps the radiation sources in place while the radiation is being released. Over time, the body naturally absorbs the collagen tile. Hear Dr Clark Chen, the chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota, explain how GammaTile Therapy works.




Is GammaTile FDA approved?


GammaTile Therapy is FDA cleared to deliver radiation therapy for patients with newly diagnosed malignant brain tumors and recurrent brain tumors.




How is GammaTile Therapy different from other types of radiation therapy used to treat brain tumors?


The two most common types of radiation therapy used to treat brain tumors are external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy. EBRT
With EBRT, the radiation comes from a machine outside of the body into the tumor area. One of the drawbacks of EBRT is that patients have to wait 2 to 3 weeks before beginning the radiation therapy to allow the surgical incision to heal after tumor removal surgery due to the potential of the radiation interfering with wound healing. Unfortunately, this treatment lapse provides a window for any remaining tumor cells to replicate and grow. In addition, EBRT requires an intense treatment schedule (of typically 15 to 30 sessions, 5 days a week, for 3 to 6 weeks) at a hospital or treatment center. Brachytherapy
With brachytherapy, or internal radiation therapy, radiation sources are placed within the tumor resection cavity during surgery. While the radiation begins working right away, the dose can be extremely high around the radiation source. This can cause serious side effects, including swelling and damage to healthy brain tissue. GammaTile Therapy
GammaTile Therapy starts targeting any remaining tumor cells immediately upon placement. With GammaTile Therapy, there is no intense treatment schedule, or need for patients and their caregivers to travel to and from a treatment center. Patients receive treatment in the comfort of their own homes, going about their daily life. GammaTile Therapy is different from traditional brachytherapy because the collagen tile provides a buffer around the radiation sources. This buffer allows the patient to receive the optimal dose of radiation to the tumor cells, while the therapy preserves healthy tissue and minimizes complications. GammaTile Therapy gives patients a head start in the fight against brain tumor regrowth while reducing the potential for side effects.




Do I have to stay in the hospital longer if I receive GammaTile Therapy?


No, typically there is no need to extend your hospital stay or to travel for additional, ongoing radiation treatments. Hear Dr Clark Chen, the chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota, explain GammaTile Therapy.




Will GammaTile Therapy lengthen my surgery?


No, GammaTile Therapy placement only takes a few minutes at the end of surgery.[1] Hear Dr Clark Chen the chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota, explain GammaTile Therapy.




Does GammaTile Therapy replace chemotherapy?


Your treatment team may use GammaTile Therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy, depending on the type of tumor. Talk with your treatment team for guidance about your individual care plan.

Hear Dr Clark Chen, the chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota, explain how GammaTile Therapy can be used in conjunction with chemotherapy




Will GammaTile Therapy cause hair loss?


With GammaTile Therapy, radiation does not have to travel from outside of the body through the scalp to reach the tumor cells. Therefore, the likelihood of hair loss is low. In a clinical study on GammaTile Therapy, only 1 out of 74 patients experienced hair loss.[2]




If I have had radiation therapy in the brain previously, can I still have GammaTile Therapy?


In a recent clinical study, all patients treated with GammaTile Therapy had previously had radiation therapy in the brain.[1] However every situation is unique. Together with your care team, your radiation oncologist will review your previous records to determine if GammaTile Therapy might be right for you.




How long is the GammaTile radioactive?


With GammaTile Therapy, 90% of the radiation dose is delivered in 33 days. After 100 days, the GammaTile radiation sources are considered completely free of radiation.




Will I need to have surgery to remove the GammaTile(s)?


No, one of the great things about GammaTile Therapy is that the body naturally absorbs the collagen tile and the small, inactive seeds remain in the body.




Can GammaTile Therapy be used for cancers outside of the brain?


Currently, GammaTile Therapy is only indicated to treat newly diagnosed malignant brain tumors and recurrent brain tumors.




Can a patient have GammaTile Therapy more than once?


Yes, it is possible to receive GammaTile Therapy more than once if you meet the medical criteria and you and your healthcare provider decide it is appropriate for you.




What are the side effects of GammaTile Therapy?


Compared to other radiation treatments, GammaTile Therapy side effects are typically fewer.[2] The potential for adverse events depends on the radiosensitivity of the exposed tissue, the amount of radiation delivered, and the placement of GammaTile(s). Because GammaTile is placed during tumor removal surgery, the possible complications of neurosurgery may also apply; including, but not limited to, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, infection, delayed hemorrhage, seizures, and adhesion formation. For more information about potential side effects, talk to your healthcare provider.





 
 

Webinars

American Brain Tumor Association | February 27, 2020

Webinar: Therapies Given During Surgery 

This webinar provides a detailed overview of surgically implanted brain tumor therapies, including GammaTile Surgically Targeted Radiation Therapy (STaRT). Dr John A. Boockvar, the director of the Brain Tumor and Pituitary/Neuroendocrine Center at Lenox Hill, discusses various treatment options, highlights their differences, and provides guidance on how patients can talk with their heath team about their care plan.

2019 Brain Tumor Webinar Series | May 26, 2019

Webinar: GammaTiles for Brain Tumors

Watch an in-depth educational webinar about GammaTile Therapy, presented by world-renowned neurosurgeon Dr Joseph Zabramski and hosted by The Musella Foundation. Content includes background, safety and efficacy, surgical placement, a case study, and clinical trial information.

Clinical Publications

FUTURE ONCOLOGY 2020
GammaTile®: Surgically targeted radiation therapy for glioblastomas

Dominic J. Gessler, MD, Clara Ferreira, PhD, Kathryn Dusenbery, MD, and Clark C. Chen, MD in Future Oncology. 2020; Published ahead of print. Doi: https://doi.org/10.2217/fon-2020-0558. Read here

SNO CONFERENCE ON BRAIN METASTASES 2020
A prospective trial of resection plus surgically targeted radiation therapy for brain metastasis

David Brachman, MD, Peter Nakaji, MD, Kris Smith, MD, Emad Youssef, MD, Theresa Thomas, MS,  Dilini Pinnaduwage, PhD, C. Leland Rogers, MD. Poster presented at: SNO 2020 Virtual Conference on Brain Metastases; August 14, 2020. Read here 

A randomized, multicenter phase III trial of surgery plus stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) compared with surgery plus permanently implanted collagen tile brachytherapy (CTBT) for resectable metastatic brain tumors-protocol in progress

Jeffrey Weinberg, MD, FAANS, FACS, Hussein Tawbi, MD, PhD, Frederick Lang, MD, Jeffrey Scott Wefel, PhD, ABPP, Jason Michael Johnson, MD, Heather Lin, PhD, Ying Yuan, PhD, Mary Frances McAleer, MD, PhD. Poster presented at: SNO 2020 Virtual Conference on Brain Metastases; August 14, 2020. Read here

 

Permanent intracavitary Cs131 brachytherapy for previously-irradiated recurrent brain metastases: initial clinical and radiation safety experience
Nelson S. Moss, MD, Brandon Imber, MD, Kavya Prasad, MS , Bae Chu, MPH , Arun Goel, MD , David Aramburu-Nunez, PhD , Michael Bellamy, PhD , T. Jonathan Yang, MD, Atif Khan, MD, Laurence Dauer, PhD , Gilad Cohen, MS , Kathryn Beal, MD, Viviane Tabar, MD. Poster presented at: SNO 2020 Virtual Conference on Brain Metastases; August 14, 2020. Read here

CURRENT ONCOLOGY REPORTS 2020
Evolving strategies to potentially further optimize surgical interventions in brain cancer 

Bindi B. Parikh, MD and Elizabeth C. Neil, MD, in Current Oncology Reports. 2020; 22, 32. Read here

JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY 2019
Resection and permanent intracranial brachytherapy using modular, biocompatible cesium-131 implants: results in 20 recurrent, previously irradiated meningiomas

David G. Brachman, MD, Emad Youssef, MD, Christopher J. Dardis, MD, Nader Sanai, MD, Joseph M. Zabramski, MD, Kris A. Smith, MD, Andrew S. Little, MD, Andrew G. Shetter, MD, Theresa Thomas, MS, Heyoung L. McBride, MD, MS, Stephen Sorensen, PhD, Robert F. Spetzler, MD, and Peter Nakaji, MDl, in the Journal of Neurosurgery. 2018;131:1683-1994. 
doi:10.3171/2018.7.jns18656. 
Read here

AANS ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS 2019 – 2020
Surgically targeted radiation therapy: a prospective trial in 79 recurrent, previously irradiated intracranial neoplasms on a prospective clinical trial

Peter Nakaji, MD, FAANS; Emad Youssef, MD; Christopher Dardis, MD; Kris Smith, MD; Dilini Pinnaduwage, PhD; David Brachman, MD, at the 2019 AANS Meeting. Read here

AMERICAN BRACHYTHERAPY SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING 2019
Surgically targeted radiation therapy: safety profile of collagen tile brachytherapy in 79 recurrent, previously irradiated intracranial neoplasms on a prospective clinical trial

David Brachman, MD, Emad Youssef, MD, Christopher Dardis, MD, Kris Smith, MD, Dilini Pinnaduwage, PhD, Peter Nakaji, MD, in Brachytherapy. 2019;18(3):S35-S36. doi: 10.1016/j.brachy.2019.04.076. Read here

SNO ANNUAL MEETING 2019

RTHP-32. First experience with GammaTile permanent implants for recurrent brain tumors

Clara Ferreira, Parham Alaei, Clark Chen, Margaret Reynolds, David Sterling, Kathryn Dusenbery, in Neuro-Oncology. 2019;21 (Supplement_6):vi216. doi:10.1093/neuonc/noz175.903. Read here

REFERENCES 

  1. Nakaji P, Youssef E, Dardis C, Smith K, Pinnaduwage D, Brachman D. Surgically targeted radiation therapy: a prospective trial in 79 recurrent, previously irradiated intracranial neoplasms. Poster presented at: 2019 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting; April 2019; San Diego, CA. 

  2. Brachman D, Youssef E, Dardis C, Smith K, Pinnaduwage D, Nakaji P. Surgically targeted radiation therapy: Safety profile of collagen tile brachytherapy in 79 recurrent, previously irradiated intracranial neoplasms on a prospective clinical trial. Brachytherapy. 2019;18(3):S35-S36.

 

TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS 

GammaTile Therapy is intended to deliver radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed malignant brain tumors and recurrent brain tumors. The potential for, and symptoms of, adverse events related to radiation exposure vary depending on the radiosensitivity of the exposed tissue, the amount of radiation delivered, and the placement of GammaTile(s). Serious side effects related to GammaTile Therapy are rare, and may include radiation brain changes including necrosis. GammaTile Therapy should not be used for patients with known history of hypersensitivity to bovine-derived materials. Possible complications can occur with any neurosurgical procedure, including cerebrospinal fluid leaks, infection, delayed hemorrhage, and adhesion formation.

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